The Gallery of Turkish Food, Part One

I have tried to write down names of things, and will undoubtedly get some of them wrong, but will happily accept corrections. Some of these are local specialties, etc. etc. Please enjoy.

Turkish delight with pistachios

Turkish delight with pistachios

Okay, so I’m not a sweet eater, but this little hole-in-the-wall sweet shop was definitely special. In the  center of Adana, in an area with lots of artisans (real artisans, making pots and pans and such, not tourist-pleasing artisans). The minute you walk in, they ply you with all kinds of goodies so that of course you have to buy. About $4 US got me a pound of chocolate halvah and a half pound of Turkish delight with sesame seeds. I hope they make it home.

Turkish delight with other nuts

Turkish delight with other nuts

More sweets

More sweets

A mountain of chocolate halvah with pistachios

A mountain of chocolate halvah with pistachios

More Turkish delight

More Turkish delight

Turkish delight and beyond

Turkish delight and beyond

Can you tell I was a bit obsessed with the sweet shop?

Appetizers at a party

Appetizers at a party

A party tonight after the first day of the conference in Adana. Interestingly enough, in Turkish it’s called “A Cocktail.” Less interesting is the fact that there were no cocktails. It is a Muslim country, after all.

Stuffed grape leaves and something in phyllo

Stuffed grape leaves and something in phyllo

Tirit

Tirit

Tirit is a type of stew made with bread and yogurt, peppers, meat, and other goodies. I thought it was really good. A colleague from the US Embassy didn’t like hers and tried to feed it to the feral cats. They didn’t really like it either.

Höşmerim

Höşmerim

This is a local specialty in Konya–it’s roasted flour, butter, sugar, cream, sprinkled with pistachios. Kind of like high class cookie dough. Not bad.

Kebab and bulgur salad

Kebab and bulgur salad

Börek

Börek

More börek

More börek

Börek comes in various shapes and sizes, but these were large flat, paper-thin filled pastries. I had mushroom and spinach, others had cheese and potatoes. They just throw them on some paper at the table and everyone digs in. In our case, we were running late, so we ate it in about 10 minutes. And it was yum.

Mulberries picked from the university grounds

Mulberries picked from the university grounds

I think this might be the first time I’ve eaten a mulberry au naturel. (The mulberry, not me.)

An artistic but not tasty interpretation of mezze

An artistic but not tasty interpretation of mezze

When good intentions go bad. The only kind of ‘fancy’ food I ate–an artsy interpretation of mezze–various little Mediterranean goodies.  Eggplant that was pickled and slimy, bulgur that was tasteless, microscopic stuffed grape leaves, some kind of cheese (that was fine, but just cheese), and something with a nut on top. Meh on the mezze.

Kebab of some sort, lentil soup with lemon, too much bread

Kebab of some sort, lentil soup with lemon, too much bread

A counterpoint to fancy food. Plain old soup and kebab. Worked for me.

Goat milk ice cream and quince substance

Goat milk ice cream and quince substance

Last but definitely not least–I don’t eat regular dairy, and rarely eat sugar. But, sometimes, I miss ice cream. A revelation: goat’s milk ice cream with quince paste on the side. Oh yeah. I’m glad it was small, because I probably would have eaten a quart of it.

Somehow, I either missed taking a picture of the lamb pide (a kind of pastry boat filled with lamb, fresh tomatoes and herbs) I had last night, or something. It was great. I’ll have to eat it again so I can get a picture.

To be continued. Next stop tomorrow is Gaziantep. Everyone here says it’s the best food in Turkey.

Another Konya Day

Cats in Konya

Cats in Konya

A very busy day in Konya, but managed to get away and go to lunch in Meram, a popular spot for picnicking and eating outdoors. We were accompanied by several very polite feral cats. After the work day, we visited the office of the Rector of Necmettin Erbakan University, where a hawk looked in through the window of the 25th floor.

A hawk looks in

A hawk looks in

Lots of great students here–it’s been a pleasure working with them.

Ece Sarıgül (center) with grad students

Ece Sarıgül (center) with grad students Zehra (L) and Busra (R)

 

Attentive graduate students

Attentive graduate students

 

Konya through a dirty window

Konya through a dirty window

A nice view of the city from the university admin building, through a very dirty window.

Walking in Meram

Walking in Meram

And now from Konya

Chickens in Konya

Chickens in Konya

Work started today–two workshops, the first with grad students and the second with faculty. It’s a bit hot here, but nothing like Adana, where it was 42 degrees today. In case you’re wondering how 42 degrees is hot, I’m talking Celsius. (For those of us stuck with Fahrenheit, that’s 108 degrees.) Adana is my next stop–but not until Sunday, hoping it cools off a bit before then.

After the workshops, went out for Turkish coffee in an ancient Greek village in the hills.

Caves in Konya

Caves in Konya

Sille Konak (great Turkish coffee)

Sille Konak (great Turkish coffee)

Inside the coffee place

Inside the coffee place

Interesting dessert of roasted flour, cream, and fresh honey.

Interesting dessert of roasted flour, cream, and fresh honey.

Watch soon for my great gallery of Turkish food.

Hello and Goodbye from Ankara

Music in the Castle courtyard (click for video–sorry it’s so small, will post larger version later)

Had a free morning before leaving for Konya. George Chinnery from the US Embassy kindly escorted me, dodging various May Day protests through the city in order to see the old city, Ataturk’s mausoleum, and good views of the city. A bit of the sounds of Turkey in the link above (short video). A few photos below.

Kids playing in the courtyard of the castle

Kids playing in the courtyard of the castle

I am feeling slightly less dazed and confused, and have managed to sleep a bit. Work begins tomorrow.

Yup that's me, and that's the Turkish flag. Proof of life.

Yup that’s me, and that’s the Turkish flag. Proof of life.

In the old city

In the old city

Leaving for Konya in about an hour. Time to get packed up.

A new book is out

My new eBook is out for Kindle (etc.). Have a look at: http://www.amazon.com/Fifty-Ways-Teach-Grammar-ebook/dp/B00C4BZS3W/ — Hey, it’s only 99 cents, so it’s hard to go wrong. The publisher, Wayzgoose Press, will provide a free copy of this, or any other book in the series, to reviewers. Contact them through their website. You can find more information by clicking the ’50 Ways’ link above as well.